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Category Archives: Tutoring

Myth #1: You need to wait until 2nd or 3rd grade to see if your child will learn to read.

There are several pre-reading skills that occur before a child starts to read with ease. The best predictor of reading is phonemic awareness, which develops between 3 – 5 years old. A screener for phonemic awareness skills is very easy to implement. Once students can blend sounds together, they need to be able to match sounds to a symbol. From there, they can begin
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Myth #4: Smart kids will figure out how to read.

A noticeably bright child who is having trouble learning to read is at a high risk for not learning to read. If your child is noticeably frustrated by reading or is faking their ability to read and you are told, “He’s bright, he’ll figure it out” or “She is still young and she’s smart – it will click for her” do not wait to
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Myth #3: Reading to your child will teach them how to learn to read.

Reading to your child will help them develop a love of reading and help them develop many critical literacy skills and print concepts. For some students who have difficulty learning to read, being read to becomes a strategy for them to memorize books so that they can appear to read. Pretending to read and memorizing stories are great habits for kids as long as
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Myth #2: Kids will learn to read when they are ready and motivated to read.

There are definitely many kids who figure out how to read after they find a book they really like. And some kids really do just need time for pre-reading skills to come together and start reading fluently. We’ve worked with families who have multiple children who were delayed readers but learned to read around 3rd or 4th grade without special help. But, much to
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New Internet Radio Talk Show on Learning, Reading and LD

Thursdays, May 8th – June 5th from 12pm – 1pm at www.youtube.com/user/LdEduTalk Five Perspectives on Learning to Read – Breaking the Code Join us every Thursday at noon to find out when to be concerned about your child’s reading, how to find help, and what to expect from your child’s school. Each week a specialist will join us to give a brief talk on
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Stick-to-it-tiveness

This article, from the National Center for Learning Disabilities, describes the six attributes needed to develop a stick-to-it attitude and different ways you can help develop them. They are: self-awareness, proactivity, perseverance, goal setting, the presence and use of effective support systems and emotional coping strategies. The Reading Clinic offers a unique experience for kids who are having a hard time sticking to their
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Learning to Read: Phonemic Awareness

Date: July 2nd, 2013 Time: Noon – 1pm Where: online Cost: Free!   To register: http://www.anymeeting.com/PIID=E956D789864631   Learning to Read – Phonemic Awareness Parents and educators will learn about the best predictor of success in reading. Topics covered will include what phonemic awareness is and why it matters, how to recognize issues with phonemic awareness, and most importantly, how to support the development of
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The Myth of Average

This TedX talk by L. Todd Rose on The Myth of  Average just might change how you view education.   We’ve already made the change to designing lessons specifically in response to child’s unique set of strengths and weaknesses so we can attest to the effectiveness of this approach. And, as described in the video,  we love the idea of supporting the in classroom experience
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Three Wishes

At The Reading Clinic we have met hundreds of students who are struggling to learn how to read.  As a result, we’ve heard some common themes about what happens in the classroom and at home. We have three simple wishes that would make a world of difference to any student learning how to read. If we had only one wish it would be this:
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Finally – A Tutoring Center that Understands My Child

Some kids have an amazing, but counter-productive, ability to mask or compensate for underlying difficulties. And for most kids, the strategies eventually stop being effective when the workload or difficulty out paces their compensatory strategies. If there’s one thing we’ve learned at The Reading Clinic it is to not assume that a child has a particular skill because of their age or apparent ability.
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